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Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)

Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)
Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)
Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)
Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)
Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)
Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)
Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)
Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)
Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)

Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)   Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)

THERE IS STILL "NO RESERVE" PRICE ON THIS ITEM. PROCEEDS GO TO OUR AID PROJECTS.

Most of our Auctions do not have any reserves put on them, and many start from just a penny!!! WE HAVE NOT HAD ANY LISTINGS UP SINCE THE MIDDLE OF LAST YEAR.

THIS WAS DUE TO OUR UK AND EUROPEAN TEAMS BEING AWAY, BASED PRIMARILY IN WEST AFRICA WORKING ON OUR LATEST PROJECTS - BUILDING / EXPANSION OF OUR TWO INFANT SCHOOLS IN VILLAGES. THE PROJECTS ALSO INCLUDED DIGGING BORE HOLES (WATER WELLS) AND PROVIDING SANITATION. WE ARE NOW BACK AND ARE EXCITED TO PRESENT OUR UNIQUE FINDINGS FROM WEST AFRICA! ANY SIGNIFICANT DAMAGE WILL BE POINTED OUT IN THE DESCRIPTIONS OR SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPHS IN OUR LISTINGS. THE FINE TRIBAL GALLERY COLLECTION.

Authentic African Antiquities & Artefacts. Village in the South of Burkina Faso. Height 72 Width 58 Depth 15. NOTE: VERY LARGE AND HEAVY ITEM.

PRIVATE COLLECTION SALE - This piece is being donate to our ORPHANS AID project by an'established collector. ALL PROFITS FROM THE SALE OF THIS ITEM GO TOWARDS OUR SCHOOL PROJECTS FOR ORPHANS IN WEST AFRICA. This lobi disfigurement figure is quite rare, not many similar pieces in any of the Ethnographic Tribal Art Museums of the World!!! Given to the collector owner in the 1980's by the village diviner as thanks for helping the Lobi village.

It was explained to him at the time, that this disfigurement figure was carved to celebrate the abstract nature of the human body. It has excellent signs of use, with both smooth and encrusted patina. It was mounted on the base in Burkina when collected. There are a few'age' cracks which are consistent with the type and density of the wood, and some amount of wood deterioration from insect activity over the years.

A certificate of authenticity and provenance will be supplied by'Fine Tribal Gallery (UK). Around 1770 the Lobi migrated from Ghana into Upper Volta. A hundred years later some of them crossed the border into what is today the Ivory Coast on their search for uncultivated land. That is why today only about 60% of the total 160,000 Lobi now live in the southwest corner of Upper Volta, while 65,000 live in the northern Ivory Coast (see Labouret, 1931:2729, 1958:1617, 37 and Fiéloux, 1976:4449).

The whole area is savanna grown over with bushes and trees. The savanna lies as a middle strip between the Sahel zone in the north and the jungle belt in the south, and extends from west to east through all West Africa. The Lobi are hoe-farmers and live mainly on millet, sorghum and corn see ill. Today hunting and fishing supplies little meat because animals have become rare after Europeans brought guns into the country.

Therefore the daily millet or corn pudding is generally accompanied by various sauces, which are usually saltless and often bitter tasting. They are prepared by the women out of fruits, leaves and roots which they either planted or gathered from bushes.

Traditionally they eat only one meal a day, in the evening after work. The Lobi live in cool mud huts with narrow doors and windows. Their flat roofs are surrounded by raised walls, giving them the appearance of roof terraces, and they remind one of small castles. Until recently, the Lobi were very warlike.

Vengeful fights were a common happening, one village fighting against another village, one family group against another. The French colonial regime which had to face a strong and persistent resistance against their efforts to colonialize the Lobi, could scarcely put a stop to this state of permanent unrest and insecurity (see Kambou, 1971, Pere, 1979:397ff). In every house (tyor) lives a minimum family unit see ill. , who has absolute authority over the other family members. , his wife(s), his married sons, who he did not yet separate. Whom he did not yet grant economical and social independence and who therefore have to work for and live with him, as well as his sons wives and the unmarried children.

The men of the house clear the fields and prepare them with hoes for the sowing. The women sow and bring home the ripe cobs carrying them in baskets on their heads. In addition, the men do most of the maintenance work and the crafts.

They build and repair houses, carve wood, forge iron and work as brass founders. The women on the other hand take care of the housework.

They collect water from a nearby brook, gather wood and carry it home; they crush the different grains in mortars with long, heavy pestles and pulverize them, a time consuming and heavy work, and they prepare meals and finally take care of the small children. In their spare time, they brew millet beer, make pottery and weave baskets and mats. They sell their products themselves and the income is at their disposal. The Lobi dont do any other kind of weaving.

Many of these activities are only done during one season. In the rain period (April through October) most of the fieldwork is done, leaving only a little time for other things. There they dance, are exuberant, drink fresh brewed millet beer, flirt with women and get to know new people. These kinds of gatherings, as seen on markets, parties and funerals, are otherwise rare in Lobi culture. For example do not have village centers or community houses where all inhabitants or even the men of the village can meet.

The houses stand far apart (between 50 to 800 meters) and seem to be disbursed randomly over the land. This impression is so strong, that as a visitor, being Lobi or European, usually one cannot tell where one village ends and another village begins. But in spite of this one can talk about villages in the Lobi culture.

A village unit is not based on topographical factors as in Europe, but on a system of groupings of neighboring houses living under a certain. An invisible being with supernatural powers and abilities. Being the head of the village, gives to the inhabitants of that village the norms (rules) for behavior that have to be followed strictly.

These norms are given through a soothsayer. Communicate in a different way than through a soothsayer. If one of these norms is broken, the.

Punishes that person by making him or somebody in his immediate surroundings ill or bringing bad harvest, accidents or other calamities on that person; they may even kill him. If an extremely important norm has been neglected in very careless way, the.

Can even punish the whole village by bringing epidemic into the village or by holding back the rain that is so essential for fields, animals and people. Is punishing the whole community for an offense against a norm that possibly only one of the villagers committed.

What are the behavior norms that a. Since these precepts are always formulated in the negative, the Lobi call them prohibitions. The prohibitions of one of the village. Could be: You shall not hurt or kill a member of your village, you shall not steal from them or seduce their wives, you shall not cause them any harm, neither in a physically visible nor magically invisible way. Though will also regulate the behavior of the villagers with prohibitions in regards to certain animals, plants, foods, even objects.

Of Korhogo, a village close to Wourbira, prohibits that long mats see ill. 4 be taken into his territory. Therefore the people of his village contrary to other Lobi have to sleep on short mats and wrap their dead in short mats when they inquire of them the cause of their death see ill. And if people from neighboring villages just bought long mats at a market, they may not cross through Korhogo on their journey home, otherwise the inhabitants of Korhogo and only they risk the sanctions of their village. Lets summarize: we call a group of neighboring houses a village when it has a common.

And therefore the same norms. These norms, or as the Lobi say prohibitions, regulate the life of the people with each other and their behavior towards certain animals, plants and objects.

Creates through these norms the social and political order as well as a feeling of togetherness and trust, which is so necessary in order for the people to live, and in light of the production methods practiced in field and house (and before in war) work together efficiently. He is personified through a shrine on the village territory see ill. 32, and a priest, the so called. Often called Lord of the Earth in the ethnological literature It is this priest who receives the prohibitions of the. Through a soothsayer and who then passes it on to the members of the village.

He is responsible for communication between the villagers and the. The Lobi have a lot of other. Are personified and taken care off will be discussed later.

Are also heads of social groups and put prohibitions on them that can be different in each case. Much of the profit raised from this sale will go towards helping some impoverished children and villagers in Cote d'Ivoire, Liberia and Ghana.

We support two orphanages, as well as several villages in West Africa to whom we supply seeds, food and clean water solutions. We also run projects which include provision of anti-Malaria medicines and nets.

We have recently aided in building two schools in remote villages, along with wells and sanitation facilities. Please see photographs towards the end of our listings of some of our recent aid efforts. Normally, PARCELFORCE or DHL are used for International Deliveries. Packages are typically insured during transit and will often need to be signed for.

The item "Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)" is in sale since Thursday, June 6, 2019. This item is in the category "Antiques\Ethnographic Antiques\African". The seller is "fine_tribal_gallery" and is located in Oxford. This item can be shipped to North, South, or Latin America, all countries in Europe, all countries in continental Asia.

  • Region of Origin: African
  • Product: Pots/ Planters
  • Age: Post-1940
  • Primary Material: Wood
  • Original/ Repro: Original


Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)   Fine Tribal Galleries RARE LOBI FIGURE BURKINA c1930 (Private Collection)